Gimkit- The “Kahoot on Steroids”

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Matthew Lim

Mr. Grillo’s students playing Gimkit.

Matthew Lim, Staff writer

Gimkit is a gamified learning tool that teachers use to help students retain information in a quick and entertaining way. This game was founded by a high school sophomore named Josh Feinsilber. Many Gimkit players compete against each other to get the most in-game cash.

In Kahoot, another competitive yet educational game, there is a time limit on each question. However, in Gimkit kids can answer at their own pace. In addition, Kahoot is just about getting answers correct quickly to obtain the most amount of points. In Gimkit, you are earning fake cash, which can buy upgrades and power-ups.

When kids accumulate cash for answering questions correctly, they can upgrade their streak bonus, insurance, multiplier and money per question. They can also get power-ups like rebooter, discounter, mini-bonus and mega-bonus. In the shop, you can buy things like “freeze traps” to freeze people, so they can’t answer questions for a limited time. However, other people can do this to you too, so be careful. It sounds like Kahoot on steroids, right?

For those interested in purchasing a Gimkit account, there are three options you can buy. One option is the free version; it has live games, assignments, classes and no ads, but you are only allowed a few game kits and you cannot edit them once created. The second option, Gimkit Pro, which a few McAuliffe history teachers have purchased, gets you all of the free version features, plus unlimited kits, unlimited edits, audio questions and image uploads, all for $4.99 per month. However, if you have more than six interested teachers, you can purchase a Gimkit Group. You get all of the Pro features and an admin panel, discounted rate, single sign-on and an annual subscription. Also, you can copy and paste Quizlet flashcards into your game kit or class, so you don’t have to type each word and answer in. 

Derek Begley, a seventh grader at McAuliffe, states, “I like Gimkit a lot better than Kahoot because it’s more interesting with in-game money, and the system is a lot better. I like the power-ups because you can affect other people in both positive and negative ways. I would rate Gimkit a nine out of 10 because it’s a great system, but there can be minor improvements.”

Annan Gunnison, another seventh grader, also states, “The trap system is annoying, but the upgrades are fine. The freeze trap system is annoying because it will prevent people from learning. It’s also annoying because you have to wait a few seconds before you answer.” The freeze trap system mentioned by Gunnison causes players to be blocked from answering for 15 seconds. This trap can be bought from the shop and can be used on anyone playing the same Gimkit.

Gimkit is an interactive and interesting learning tool that teachers can use periodically with their lessons. The items in the shop make the learning process enjoyable to many students; the knowledge gained is just a bonus!